Category: Relationships

  • What do psychiatry and paediatrics have in common?

    What do psychiatry and paediatrics have in common?

    The power of the therapeutic relationship.

  • It takes a village

    It takes a village

    On family—nuclear, extended and mine—and why Winnicott’s “good enough parent” is one of my favourite concepts in psychology.On family—nuclear, extended and mine—and why Winnicott’s “good enough parent” is one of my favourite concepts in psychology.

  • Living on your terms

    Living on your terms

    How I went from being a pushover to speaking up for myself, asking for what I wanted and refusing what I didn’t.

  • Giving the performance of my life

    Giving the performance of my life

    I’ve never been been a natural performer. So it’s nerve-wracking to know you’re being judged by how well you perform. But that’s how engaging with humans works, and like everyone else I’ve had to figure it out.

  • Call me by my name

    Call me by my name

    My name is Ayomide and I want to talk about names: what they mean, who gets to give them and why all of it matters.

  • Hanlon’s Razor is a way to be generous

    Hanlon’s Razor is a way to be generous

    Shaving with Hanlon’s razor about once a week helps me stay generous and avoid cynicism. No, Hanlon isn’t a brand of blade, and it’s certainly not for shaving my beard. It’s a super helpful principle for thinking about why people do what they do. You might say it’s for “shaving” human motivation. I like to […]

  • How uniformity kills unity

    How uniformity kills unity

    We tend to mistake uniformity for unity. Uniformity is about looking the same, while unity is about actually being one.This means that unity is internal: it begins with agreeing on some fundamentals as being most important and then working together to build in alignment with those fundamentals. Uniformity, on the other hand, is external: looking […]

  • Take kids seriously by not taking yourself too seriously

    Take kids seriously by not taking yourself too seriously

    The two adults who had the greatest impact on me growing up took me seriously—but didn’t take themselves too seriously.

  • Circles of obligation

    For a typical Nigerian, a small wedding is maybe 300 guests. That’s big in the UK: The difference is due to circles of obligation.

  • A therapist is a mirror (for your mind)

    A therapist is a mirror (for your mind)

    “You should try therapy.” Pause. What’s your instinctive response to that statement? Agreement? Disagreement? Scepticism? Laughter? Something else? (I’d like to hear what you chose!) In my experience—and I’m sure, that of anyone who’s worked in mental healthcare—scepticism is super common. And I find that equal parts frustrating and fascinating, because a lot of people […]